The Power
of Plants
and People

The Power
of Plants
and People

The Power
of Plants
and People

The Power
of Plants
and People

The Power
of Plants
and People

The Power
of Plants
and People

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DCH is the only nonprofit membership organization in Delaware that mobilizes and inspires community greening statewide in urban and suburban environments. By inspiring an appreciation for improving our environment through horticulture, education, and conservation, we have become a leader in improving and beautifying communities by harnessing the power of our members, volunteers, and staff to go out and make a difference. Our members come from Delaware and the surrounding region and bring with them a passion for plants only matched by that of our staff members. With more than 600 active and dedicated volunteers annually, we have a tremendous amount of community support, which allows us to accomplish the impossible.

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There are many species of goldenrod (Solidago spp.) and at this time of year they all get a bad rap. Many people blame these beautiful yellow flowers for their fall allergies, while the actual culprit is likely ragweed. Ragweed is pretty inconspicuous, so the brightly colored goldenrod gets the blame. If you’re still wary, take a look at a goldenrod plume in bloom – it will likely be covered in pollinators, meaning it is not wind pollinated (and not causing your allergies).

The Pest of the Week is......Goldenrod.

Most of the species of goldenrod are native to North America, and they frequently hybridize among themselves. Whether the seeds blow into your garden, or you plant it deliberately for a fall display and pollinator magnet, many of the species are aggressive colonizers. This growth habit makes them especially difficult to control in farm and pasture settings.

The first key to controlling goldenrod is to place it in a location where you don’t mind it expanding. Rhizome barriers can help keep it contained in perennial borders. If your goldenrod does get out of control, you have a few options. In a garden setting, digging out the plant is likely your best option. It is important to remove as much of the rhizome as possible. In intense situations, some gardeners report completely renovating a bed to remove the goldenrod. Herbicides may be necessary as a last resort, but to avoid collateral damage to surrounding plants you may consider cutting back the plant and dabbing cut stems with the herbicide.

If there is a pest you can’t identify or one that you would like to see featured, please leave us a comment below.
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